It’s Not So Obvious

“If you live in a hard-partying area of the country, you may not want to buy a new car that was assembled on a Monday. And, you may not want to shoot pool with someone whose first name is the name of a major city”. Just some considerations learned from experience.

In heavy industrial maintenance, seasoned professionals have their own hard-won cautions like the above. Those may not always be obvious. Wouldn’t it be great if those tidbits of knowledge, however, were somehow automatically transferable through the generations? However, natural powers, or gremlins, seem to insure constant attrition; constant turnover of experienced maintenance personnel, and the subsequent loss of their esoteric talents.

It’s a terrible thing to know you have solved a problem only to see things go from bad to worse because of a less-than-obvious semi-related circumstance.

Let’s say you are trouble shooting a problem where there is obvious “pitting” on the surface of a stainless shaft. For a host of reasons, pitting will eventually lead to a shaft failure. Before you begin looking into the usual suspects related to corrosion, do a little forensic investigation and see if that is really the main problem you want to solve. Pitting may not be The Big Offending Kahuna.

The shaft in question may be extra long with a small diameter (Linguini). Straightness, as in the case of a vertical mixer shaft, may be a primary concern. Let’s assume the opposite configuration of a larger diameter shaft with relatively short length (fat and stubby). In either case, straightness happens to be a key element. So, in the hierarchy of concerns; pitting is subordinate to straightness.

Most stainless-steel shaft grades, by nature of their chemistry and grain structure, retain substantial amounts of stress. Those retained stresses contribute to bow, twist, or fracture. There are grades of stainless steel, however, that respond well to thermal stress relief.  Most of the retained stress is able to be removed. (less retained stress, less movement in machining and in subsequent service). These grades resist pitting, but maybe not as well as other grades. Remember though, if the shaft never makes it into service, the potential life expectancy is irrelevant.

You know steel shafts may be straightened mechanically; so, just solve the pitting problem with a material change and then straighten the shaft. But, if the shaft configuration, or the final machined configuration, does not allow for conventional mechanical straightening, or that process would require equipment that is not readily available, or the straightener guy is just plain incompetent, experience may have opted for a steel chemistry that would be less susceptible to warp and bow; either in machining or in service. The luxury of post machining straightening was not considered an option. The best steel choice in this case may not be the one with the best Pitting Resistance Equivalency (PRE). (If the shaft never makes it into service, service life is irrelevant).

To be effective in the industrial maintenance field you must be intuitive and organized. Assuming you are, then pointing out the need to look at more than one contributor to material failure is obvious. Considering the relativity of an incompetent straightener to a pitting condition, is not so obvious.

-Howard Thomas, March 6th 2018